Thursday, September 4, 2008

3 Poems For the Day

Buson's Coffee

La Colombe,
Wednesday:
An empty feeling.


* * *

High Stakes

Sex
is a steep wager.


* * *

The Last Word

Death tramples poetry,
with nary a sound:
This time silence
has the last word;
the audience in Hell,
violently indifferent.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Really more an email than a comment, but didn't see any email link. This is regarding your "Between Heaven and Hell" articles, which I originally found via the Philly Weekly article...

You might be interested in the following blog, by a Catholic hermit who also has health problems (epilepsy). Just seemed you might find something that she talks about of interest.

http://notesfromstillsong.blogspot.com/

Notes from Stillsong Hermitage

Stillsong Hermitage is a diocesan (Canon 603) hermitage in the Camaldolese Benedictine tradition. The name reflects the essential joy and wholeness that comes from a Christ-centered life of silence and solitude, but also points to the fact that contemplative life --- even that of the hermit--- spills over into witness and proclamation. At the heart of the Church, in the stillness and joy of God's dynamic peace, resonates the song which IS the hermit.

The following are the entries where she talks about her medical condition in theological terms:

http://notesfromstillsong.blogspot.com/search/label/chronic%20illness%20and%20disability%20as%20vocation

Saturday, August 23, 2008
Personal Questions on the Vocation to Chronic Illness

Since I was a young adult I have suffered from a medically and surgically intractable seizure disorder (epilepsy). For some years it went undiagnosed (or inadequately so), and for many more years (25 or more) it was life-threatening on a regular basis. It also resulted in injuries, some of which led to chronic pain because of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy --- a condition characterized by neuropathic pain which results when soft tissue injuries do not heal quite properly. Today, the seizure disorder is relatively well, though not completely controlled (seizures are triggered by some types of external stimuli which are more prevalent today than in the past), but the chronic pain continues as a daily reality. Evenso, I take Rx pain relievers (which I believe is the only responsible thing to do here), and the med I now take for seizure control has a happy side effect of helping diminish neuropathic pain as well! The bottom line is that I function well in spite of these things, and am (Deo Gratias!!) graced by God in ways which cause other things than these to dominate!!

--sgl